SEC Gets Nearly $70M Judgment Against Richmond, VA Firms, CEO Find Liable for Securities Fraud

AIC Inc., Community Bankers Securities LLC, and CEO Nicholas D. Skaltsounis must pay a nearly $70 million judgment for securities fraud, in the wake of an earlier trial that found them liable. The Securities and Exchange Commission had accused them of conducting an offering fraud while selling millions of dollars in AIC promissory notes and stocks to investors in different states, including unsophisticated investors and elderly customers.

The regulator accused them of omissions and misrepresentations of material information about the investments, their risks, the return rates, and how the money would be used by AIC, which is a financial services holding company, and Community Bankers Securities, its subsidiary brokerage firm. The SEC argued that the companies were not profitable and new investors’ money was used in Ponzi scam fashion to repay returns and principal to earlier investors.

Last year, a jury ruled in the SEC’s favor against AIC, Community Bankers Securities and Skaltsounis. Now, AIC must disgorge over $6.6 million, over $969,00 in prejudgment interest, and a $27.95 million penalty. Community Bankers Securities disgorgement is $2.8 million, over $400,000 in prejudgment interest, and a $27.95 million penalty. Skaltsounis is to pay over $2.5 million dollars in total.

SEC enforcement division director Andrew Ceresney said that these penalties should reinforce that the regulator is determined to aggressively go after companies and individuals to hold them accountable when they are not truthful with investors, even taking them to trial when necessary.

Just last month, the SEC filed administrative proceedings against a Seattle, WA investment advisor for misusing over $8 million in client moneys and making loans to himself. Dennis H. Daugs and his Lakeside Capital Management are accused of borrowing $3.1 million from one client without her consent.

The SEC also claims that Daugs and Lakeside Capital improperly directing an investment fund that the firm managed to make over $4.5 million in investments and loans. The money was used to facilitate personal real estate deals, purchase a luxury vacation home, refinance a vintage auto, and fend off claims of over $500,000 from firm clients.

Daugs and Lakeside Capital have repaid the diverted monies. They also consented to settle SEC charges and pay over $340,000 in disgorgement and interest to the investment funds and the one client. They also agreed to pay a $250,000 penalty. Daugs agreed to a 5-year minimum industry bar.

Our investment advisor fraud lawyers help investors recoup their money. Working with a securities attorney dramatically increases your chances of getting back all or most of your losses. You want to work with a securities fraud law firm that has the resources and experience to help you recover your money. Your case consultation with us is free. Contact Shepherd Smith Edwards and Kantas, LTD LLP today.

SEC Obtains Nearly $70 Million Judgment Against Richmond, Va.-Based Firms and CEO Found Liable for Defrauding Investors, SEC, August 1, 2014

Adviser misused $8 million in client funds: SEC, Investment News, July 17, 2014

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