FINRA Wants To Delay Implementing Rule Impacting Nontraded REIT Customers’ Statements

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority wants the Securities and Exchange Commission to grant a delay in the implementation of proposed changes to rule 2340, which impacts customer account statements. The self-regulatory organization had originally asked for the modifications to go into effect six months after the SEC approves the rule change. Now, FINRA wants to give nontraded REIT sponsors and brokerage firms 18 months to adjust to the revised guidelines.

Nontraded REITs are currently not required to show an estimated per-share valuation until 18 months after the sponsors cease to raise funds. Under the proposed rule change, broker-dealer client account statements would eliminate the existing practice of listing at $10 the value, for every share, of a nontraded REIT. This is usually the price that registered representatives sell them at.

The rule change would factor the different commissions and fees that dealer managers and brokers get. It would lower the price per share for every private placement or nontraded REIT found on the account statement of a customer.

Also, trusts would have to show what the valuation is per-share within three to six months. At that point investors would see a below $10/share valuation.

Also, broker-dealer and representative commissions would be able to subtract 12% for the original investment, as well as offering and organizational costs, off a client’s original investment so that an REIT’s estimated sold value would be reduced to $8.80/share price.

The rule that FINRA wants to implement provides two methodologies for broker-dealers to apply after an estimated value is considered reliable: The first method is the independent valuation and can be used at any time. The net investment methodology may be applied for up to two years under certain conditions.

Investors of non-traded real estate investment trusts often find their original investment eroded when the real estate investment trusts give back capital as distributions and dividends to investors. The proposed rule would give investors a better understanding of the costs in buying nontraded REITS shares.

Our non-traded REIT lawyers represent investors who have suffered losses in real estate investment trusts and non-traded REITs that were caused by securities fraud, including the inappropriate solicitation and marketing of these investments. Maybe your broker did not apprise you of the risks or costs involved. Or, perhaps they promoted REITs or Nontraded REITs to you as suitable for your investment goals even though your portfolio was never going to be able to handle the risks.

At Shepherd Smith Edwards and Kantas, LTD LLP, we help investors recoup their REIT fraud losses. Contact our real estate investment trust firm today and ask for you free case consultation. We have helped thousands of investors get their money back.

Finra asks for delay in implementing rule affecting nontraded REIT customer statements, Investment News, July 15, 2015


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